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In health care and medicine, mistakes are sometimes made. Unintentionally amputating the wrong foot; whoops. Erroneously injecting three times the proper dosage of penicillin; sorry about that. Incorrectly mailing Mr. […]
When the Philadelphia Museum of Art purchased Henry Ossawa Tanner’s painting The Annunciation in 1899, they became the first American museum to acquire a work by an African-American artist. That purchase announced a new era of recognition of African-American art and artists just as much as the painting itself announced a new style of art moving away from stereotypical “black” scenes towards a freedom of aesthetic choice. Persons of color could express themselves in any way, even abstraction, but faced the new problem of remaining true to themselves at the same time. The new exhibition Represent: 200 Years of African American Art and accompanying catalogue show how these artists faced the challenges posed to them by art and society and provide all of us with a fascinating guide to facing African-American history—tragic, tenacious, transcendent—through its art.
The idea of forgery resonates more than ever today in a culture in which "the open exchange of ideas has been rebranded as piracy." 
People with synesthesia "inhabit a strange no-man's-land between reality and fantasy. They taste colors, see sounds, hear shapes, or touch emotions in myriad combinations." We recognize this condition in infants, as well as artists, who seek to defamiliarize perceptions of reality.